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Retro Review: Frequencies - A Scientific Love Story

Submitted by melissa on November 30, 2016 - 8:04am


 

We've all heard that "opposites attract," but why? Writer, producer and director Darren Paul Fisher (The Inbetweeners) offers his explanation in Frequencies with the idea the each person has a certain "frequency," be it high or low. In simple terms, those with low frequencies are unlucky and those with high are in sync with the world around them.

From their very first encounter as children in school, Zak (low frequency) is smitten with unemotional Marie (high frequency). She's methodical and intrigued by him, but nothing more. Zak's friend, Theo, observes the two, analyzing their situation. They advance in years, becoming teenagers, and then young adults. The two eventually fall in love, causing problems which reach much farther than they would have imagined.

Retro Review: Filth Starring A Different Side of James McAvoy

Submitted by petrocs on November 16, 2016 - 6:40am


 

Irvine Welsh has created some of the most thought provoking novels of the past 25 years, so much so that many pieces of his literary collection have been adapted in some form over the years. From the Danny Boyle's 1996 classic film Trainspotting to Paul McGuigan's film, The Acid House, each director has lent their unique talents to the telling of Welsh's cult classics. While a series of adaptation failures plagued Welsh in the late 1990's thru the early 2000's, there has always been a vibe around the announcement of another project. This year brings director Jon S. Baird's take on the mind and words of Irvine Welsh, the 1998 novel Filth, and I'm confident in saying it is the best adaptation of an Irvine Welsh novel since Trainspotting.

Now on Demand & iTunes, in theaters May 30th

Retro Review: The Infinite Man

Submitted by Indiebizliz on October 26, 2016 - 9:00am


 

Have you ever thought of an awful/embarrassing/heartbreaking moment in your life and thought, “if I could just go back to that moment…” In The Infinite Man, we find Dean, brilliant scientific mind with the intentions of creating the perfect anniversary weekend for his girlfriend Lana. But, nothing is ever perfect. When events don't go according to plan, Dean works tirelessly for an entire year to invent time travel that will reset the events of the original day. If he can just avoid running into himself. Stuck in a mind-bending loop, both he and Lana ( and a weirdo of an ex-boyfriend) weave in and out of “the present” to amend their relationship.

Writer/Director Hugh Sullivan deserves a job offer from the Doctor Who writing staff. This script is written with such creative precision, it should be studied. I was constantly on the edge of my seat, trying to figure out how each scene would play out in respect to the loop. Catching new clues here and there but ultimately blown away by each new revelation. High five, Hugh. I find myself predicting the ending of most film and television shows about 30 minutes in, these days. This film is a beautiful 85 minutes in length and not once did I even glance at my watch. I had no idea what was ever coming next.

Doc Spotlight: Tom Berninger's 'Mistaken for Strangers'

Submitted by Spirit of the Thing on September 30, 2016 - 9:03am


 

Documentaries about musicians are popping up everywhere these days. Hell, one (Waiting for Sugar Man) even won the Oscar for Best Documentary Feature in 2013. Most tend to focus on a musician's obscurity as in Sugar Man, a band's last hurrah as in Shut Up and Play the Hits, or a band's rise and fall (and subsequent return) like loudQUIETloudTom Berninger's quasi-doc about The National, Mistaken for Strangers, is nothing like any of these...and this is precisely why it's so good.

In theaters, on demand and iTunes! Screenings here!

It seems as if the film is supposed to be a standard doc about a band on the road. Shot (mostly) and directed by the brother (Tom Berninger) of The National's lead singer Matt Berninger, we get a familiar scenario - little brother is asked to go on tour with big brother and help out doing roadie type stuff, mostly acting as liaison/assistant to the band. Tom still lives with his parents in Cincinnati and while we don't get much of a view into his life, we can tell that he doesn't have much going on. And there's nothing wrong with that.

Retro Review: Only Lovers Left Alive

Submitted by melissa on September 6, 2016 - 9:00am


 

Every person I know that has seen Only Lovers Left Alive has nothing but praise for it, of which I wholeheartedly agree. At the center of the tale are two vampires who, married, live in different parts of the world.  After such a long physical separation, Adam and Eve (fantastic, right?) are reunited and are immediately inseparable as if no time has passed. This bliss doesn't last, however, when Eve's sister arrives and stirs up trouble in paradise.

As a special treat, we have two reviews for you, one from Michael aka Petrocs, and the other from Jeremy aka Spirit of the Thing.

Set against the romantic desolation of Detroit and Tangier, an underground musician, deeply depressed by the direction of human activities, reunites with his resilient and enigmatic lover.

Their love story has already endured several centuries at least, but their debauched idyll is soon disrupted by her wild and uncontrollable younger sister. Can these wise but fragile outsiders continue to survive as the modern world collapses around them? 

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